Archive for November, 2007

Last Chance to Get 2007 Pricing

Friday, November 30th, 2007

We’re in the last weeks of 2007, and I wanted to remind people that we’re raising most of our prices on 1 January 2008. If you want to contract any work with us, you’ll want to do that during December, when you can still get this year’s prices.

If you want to wait until early 2008 for us to start the project, that’s fine. As long as you sign the contract and pay the 50% of your contract amount before or on 31 December 2007, we’ll honour the prices in your contract.

So as you’re starting to wrap up your holiday season eBay sales, and thinking about how you can improve, grow, be more profitable, and compete more strongly, think of us while you can still get 2007 prices!

http://www.aswas.com/pricing.shtml

If you want more help from more companies than just us, look at registering for our conference for eBay sellers. http://www.aswasconference.com


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When a Restaurant is Sold

Thursday, November 29th, 2007

One of my fave places in town was sold. I didn’t know. I found out by accident. By eating there.

Oh, the menus are different! Guess they reprinted them. But there is my favourite dish. I’ll have that, please.

And it comes. And it’s really mediocre. And the ingredients are all different. And it’s just not that good.

And I’m apologising to the friend I brought to lunch because I had promised him that this was one of the best meals in our small town. He wasn’t getting why I liiked it so much. I wasn’t liking it so much.

So note to restaurant buyers. You’re not fooling me. You can leave the last family’s name on the awning, but if you’re not using their recipes, I’m going to notice. And if your recipes aren’t as good or better, I’m going to notice.

I’m not going back because it was that bad. Good luck to the new owners.


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Playing To The Desperate

Wednesday, November 28th, 2007

I just found this on the website of a supposedly respected eBay instructor and author.

Want to do nothing and Make Money?
I want to do nothing and Make More Money!!
Sign Me Up!!
Make More Money for doing nothing?

Have an additional stream of revenue coming in and not have to work?
No, I am not joking. All you have to do is join the wildly successful Make More Money affiliate program, follow the easy how-to steps to sell the best-selling eBay Success Books, and you get a chunk of money from us each month!

Use your About Me page to make money
Are you even using your valuable About Me page? If you utilize it correctly, it turns into a money-making tool for you. Simply use the easy instructions to put text on your About Me page that directs the reader to our site…when your customer buys, you get PAID. You do not have to do any of the work – we will process the orders and do the shipping.
   

DO NOTHING & GET MONEY
See…easy!
Not a lot of people understand how easy it is to make money with affiliate programs…and those of us who DO KNOW how easy it is, also know there are very few legitimate money making programs out there. This program is one of the good ones.

OK I think I’m done throwing up. This is so upsetting to me. I know NOBODY making a living from affiliate programmes. I know NOBODY who stopped working and found "financial freedom" from selling eBay success books or ebooks to anybody. And this is written like the reader is a child. I want to do nothing and make more money! Sign me up so I can do nothing and make more money. Did I mention doing nothing and making money?!

Valuable About Me page? Our latest research shows that About Me pages are being read LESS than ever. A few times a month, even for some of the big PowerSellers we work with. Even sellers trying to send people to the About Me page from their listings are seeing very few people hitting that page. We know this from our EverySeller Research tool. :)

 

The person who wrote this is trying to get you to sell HER products,
not those random products that seem to have no author in particular,
and just keep getting resold all over the internet. "Do nothing and make money" may be true, but the way this is written sounds like the desperate appealing to the desperate.


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“Please Click… I Have To Pay The Bills”

Tuesday, November 27th, 2007

I read some of the blogs put out there by so-called eBay experts and eBay consultants. I mostly find these people to lack integrity, and often to lack any useful information.

I guess you do too since recently, at the end of a blog post, one such "expert" asked that you click on his link because he "has to pay the bills too." I guess it’s hard out there for an affiliate programme pimp.

If you were that good a consultant, speaker, author, eBay seller, or whatever you claim to be doing, you wouldn’t need to ASK your blog readers to click on your stuff so you can get a few dollars. Maybe a few cents. That just sounds desperate. And it makes me think that your consulting, speaking, authoring, eBay selling, and so on are all failing.

You don’t see me asking people to please click on my affiliate links so I can pay my bills!


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Where We Got Our Name

Saturday, November 24th, 2007

Well, somebody FINALLY put it up on YouTube. I’ve been looking for this for years.

I saw this as a toddler, I believe when I was 2 in 1974. It stuck in my mind. When I was forming my company when I was 19, my father asked what I was naming it. "As Was," I said, and I don’t remember my thought process at all. He didn’t care about my thought process, and told me I was a jerk. Until he saw me coming up high in all kinds of things that were alphabetised. :)

So hooray, here it is. Share in my glory! :)


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Wrong Time To Solicit

Friday, November 23rd, 2007

A few of my clients have recently been receiving emails and calls from some of the software providers in the eBay space. That may not sound out of the ordinary, but to me, it is.

  1. How are these companies choosing my client? Are the looking for As Was clients specificially, or are they targeting eBay sellers in general?
  2. Do they really think that eBay sellers right now, in the thick of their holiday selling, have time to evaluate and consider a whole new software application?
  3. Do they really think that right now, eBay sellers have the time to change to a whole new system? New ways to list, sell? New marketplaces? New strategies? Right now?!??!
  4. Do cold calls or cold emails really work? I find that when we used to contact people "coldly," they were bothered that someone was writing to them saying that they could help their sales or businesses. They seemed to take it emotionally as if I had emailed them that they were obese and needed a new haircut.
  5. One of the software providers emailed one of my clients some of his recent sales figures, and that he should keep up the good work because _____ (software company unnamed) can help sellers selling over $50K/month. My client wanted to know how they got those figures. Also, that software company has signed eBay sellers who have never sold anything before… so why not tell them to switch NOW? Why tell them that someday, they’ll live up to the software company’s standards, and then they should switch?
  6. These are the biggest companies in my industry. I’ve rarely said these names to a seller and had them say, "I’ve never heard of them." So this can’t be for visibility. We all know who you are. So then what are you doing!!!!

I can’t IMAGINE writing to or calling an eBay seller, especially who is not expecting to hear from me, trying to get them to make a huge business change in the middle of their busiest season, and then telling them that they don’t quite meet my client standards, so hopefully we can work together when they’ve grown a bit more. What the HELL is that?

That’s bad marketing. Let my clients and other eBay sellers get through their holiday seasons. If you’re going to cold call/email these people, at least do it when they have time to pay attention to you.


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Don’t Ask That Question

Thursday, November 22nd, 2007

One of the things this blog is about is my study of human behaviour, and how we present ourselves to each other. I overheard a conversation in my favourite sushi restaurant a couple of weeks ago.

A Dad, trying to be cool, had taken out his two daughters and one of their friends (from what I could tell). Maybe only one was his daughter. But it looked like three 12-yr-old girls and this Dad guy. He was trying to make conversation with them, which was cute.

Until I heard this exchange.

Dad: "(girl’s name that I didn’t catch), I heard you got a dog but had to give him away."

Girl: ‘Yeah."

Daughter: "Dad, he was SOOOO cute."

Silence. More silence. I’m like OUUUUCH, that is NOT the question to ask a 12-yr-old girl. Please ask her ANYTHING but about a puppy she couldn’t keep.

Oy.


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Is the Customer Always Right?

Wednesday, November 21st, 2007

I think we have to get rid of the phrase, ‘The customer is always right." When I think of some of my buying experiences lately, I was treated like I was not right. I was told that there is a better product choice for me, and I was shown that. I was sold! If you treated me like I’m always right, then you would have just sold me what I asked for, removing your professional opinion.

We have to put in our professional opinion all the time. That’s consulting. :) We don’t believe the customer is always right. If our clients knew everything, they wouldn’t need us. We know that people need us, and we want to give the advice (and warnings) they need. So we have to treat people like they are wrong at times because they are.

The Marx Brothers had a bit on this topic. Chico is working in a men’s suit department, and his main training was "The customer is always right." A man is trying on a suit or jacket of some sort, and whatever he says, Chico agrees with him… because the customer is always right. The man declares that he doesn’t think he looks very good in that item, and Chico agrees that he looks terrible. Finally, the man tells Chico he’s not a very good salesman. Chico says, "Datsa right. I’m rotten."

Let’s not kiss butts. Let’s give the customer the best we can, even if it means pointing out that in a small or big way, the customer is wrong.


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Magician and Scientist?

Tuesday, November 20th, 2007

Each month, I get a free magazine that’s some sort of lifestyle magazine for my town. It’s more than half advertising. In the October issue, an ad caught my eye.

It had a huge picture of an Asian man in a very bright red robe. In huge font, there is a quote from this guy, and it starts with:

"Feeling confident as possible is important to me whether in my work as a professional scientist or my performances as a magician."

Huh? A research scientist with a PhD and MBA, and he’s also listed in the ad as the "Top Stage Magician of Arizona." Never heard of him, and he’s the top.

What an odd combo of jobs, and this ad was for a dentist. Evidently, his teeth help him with his research science confidence.


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How To Get Me To Choose Your Competitor

Monday, November 19th, 2007

So I’ve been playing with Salesforce and the applications that can be installed into Salesforce. I’ve been demo’ing and testing all kinds of apps. I ran into one that I wanted to try. I couldn’t just try it. They asked me to fill out a form to get a demo license of some sort.

OK, I filled it out. A day or two went by. I got an email from a sales guy asking me a handful of questions (8 I think there were) about my company and needs. I answered immediately. I waited days.

By the time the guy left me a voice mail, I had already selected another product. How? Because that product let me install a trial version right into Salesforce, right away. So we started using it. When we had a problem, that company supported us immediately. We fell in love with the app, and now we’re done.

The sales guy called again on Friday. I told him we chose another app, and I told him why. He was like, "Let me give you my phone number." I said no thanks. I won’t choose their company for anything, ever, and why?

Because they treated their product like it was a freaking secret. I had tried 3 other companies’ competing products in the time it took them to have a sales guy call me… which is not even what i wanted. I don’t want a sales guy. I want a demo account. I jumped through two hoops to get there. Don’t make me jump through another in talking to a sales guy. Just let me demo it for myself. It must be one shitty product if they want to make it that hard for you to see it.

So while the sales guy was thinking about me as a lead, planning to call me, and planning to waste my time by continuing to NOT give me the demo account, I tried 3 products. I uninstalled two of them. I’m keeping one of them. And that’s how you didn’t get my business. You wanted layers and layers of contact in a high-instant-gratification, online platform world.

How hard do you make it for your target audience, who wants your product, to get a taste? How long do you make them wait?


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