Posts Tagged ‘eBay design’

eBay Cassini Search Update Needs Good eBay Design

Tuesday, September 17th, 2013

Here as As Was we love the eBay Cassini search update. It rewards good data and most of all good eBay design.

So what has eBay’s Cassini update got to do with eBay design anyway?

Lots.

This update is all about relevance, trust, value & convenience. One of the crucial factors in this update is the ability to hold a buyers attention and close the deal. eBay are weighing up sellers and listings by comparing how many impressions they receive to how many sales they generate.

If your title and catalog/item specifics data is spot on they will find you.

Then comes the crucial bit. Your description layout, where your eBay design sits.

This part of the eBay experience can make or break a sale. If your buyer hits the back button as they can’t find what they need, that’s one more impression that out weighs a sale.

Our eBay designs are PROVEN to increase sales by increasing buyer conversions. We create that experience for your buyer to instill trust, show key information that may sway the buying decision, and have an overall pleasant experience while shopping.

A bad eBay design or description layout will soon start to affect your ranking in search. It is now more important that ever to get good advice and partner with an experienced eBay design company like As Was.

We shall be talking more about Cassini on our blog as there are important factors to consider around your entire eBay operation and not just design. We are a consulting company, we consider more than just your eBay template.

 


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eBay Design, a cautionary tale….

Monday, February 11th, 2013

In talking to eBay sellers all over the world, you get to be an agony aunt when it comes to design troubles. These are some cautionary points based on stories from REAL sellers.

1. Don’t get locked in

A lock in is something you might find at an Irish bar and shouldn’t be something you find with eBay design. You need to be able to take your eBay design and use it with ANY listing tool with a template system or just though eBay alone. Say, you were an inkfrog seller for a while and wanted to move to solid commerce. In an ideal world you would take your template, change the place holders to match the new system and VOILÀ!

However, BEFORE you sign contracts and pay make sure this can happen. There are those companies who make it difficult or completely impossible to do this. Either with bad coding that only ‘works’ with certain systems or if they offer a design service as part of a selling tool you could lose your design investment if you move.

As Was templates can be moved by just changing place holders within the HTML and changing image URLs if your image locations change. Our templates also work with multiple platforms and still work on your iPad :)

2. The people in charge of your design have never sold on eBay

…and even worse, don’t even BUY off eBay.

Would you trust a driving instructor who had trained in the test center but never driven on actual roads? So why do this with your eBay design? I am surgically attached to the eBay app on my phone and have been a seller on eBay, this is WHY I make good decisions about your eBay business.

Check the experience of the person responsible for the concept. Question their decisions and put yourself in the position of your customer. The layout of your eBay template is EVERYTHING!

3. The design company is just a business, they don’t care about design…just $$$

Design is an art, a passion and so is eBay. You need to make sure you employ people to design for you who care about your business and not just about the money. When you investigate a company you need to make sure they are INTERESTED in design all the way to the core. If the Managing Director of a company has never been involved in design and their other business is insurance, then they are not for you. The culture of a company always starts at the top.

I hope this will help you make better decisions when it comes to choosing which design company to work with.

 

 


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Has Your Designer Ever Listed To eBay?

Tuesday, June 7th, 2011

Oh, Twitter. Your public nature makes things like this so easy. About 2 weeks ago, a guy who works for a company who claims to compete against us tweeted something in his personal Twitter account. It’s fun what you can find when searching Twitter for “list* first eBay” to see who’s starting out.

In case the graphic isn’t coming up, he’s tweeting that he JUST listed his first item on eBay ever… which even he found “surprising” since he has been designing Stores for eBay for 4 years now.

Ugh.

It’s amazing what natural As Was selling points I stumble upon. I remember years ago when I was surprised that I had to actually tell potential clients that unlike other companies, we KNOW eBay rules. We follow them! You’re not going to end up in trouble with eBay, and watch your items suffer in Best Match, because we designed something that got you in trouble. I also try to explain to people that we’re consultants. We’re here to understand their whole business, and help where we can, especially in listing strategy. Giving you a design makes no sense if you’re not going to use the right eBay strategies to get it seen and found in search!

The next selling point was that our design and other work isn’t sent to Eastern Europe. Not sent to Asia. Not being done in Israel, India, China, or the Phillippines. And nobody on my staff is a “junior.” I didn’t think those were selling points until I found out what other companies were doing. And then, yes, we’re offering something better than that!

Then it was that we didn’t get cracked down on in January 2009 for breaking eBay Store design rules. While other companies had to take down or change hundreds and hundreds of eBay Stores, we had never designed eBay Stores outside of the rules. So our clients didn’t have anything to change. Selling point!

Evidently now, I also need to tell potential customers that we’re better than other design companies they may be considering because my staff are former and current eBay sellers. They actually know eBay rather well! This is also an important point for people who are considering using Elance, oDesk, or other “find a random person” systems for eBay design. Have they ever listed on eBay? Do they know the rules? Will they fix their work if eBay finds it’s against the rules?

At this point, potential clients are coming to me having Googled these companies who you might call competitors, though I know we don’t really compete. I refuse to do what they do, how they do it, as it doesn’t match my standards. They don’t offer what we do, and certainly not how we do it. But sure, you could hire them instead of us. The real question would be… knowing the above, and Googling everybody to see the word on the street, why would you want to hire anybody else?! :)


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